The library subscribes to the following magazines. Stop by the Library/CENTRAL floor to look through any of these...

  • Car & Driver

    • cars...drivers...automotive tech...rankings of new cars...etc.
  • Motor Trend

    • rather similar to Car & Driver, oddly enough
  • ESPN Magazine

    • sports and athletes. You know.
  • The Surfer's Journal

    • this is one beautiful journal. Thick pages, striking photography, interesting, in-depth stories about people who surf, places to surf, and surfing's history. Seems to be supported by a few major sponsors (Patagonia, Yeti, Rainbow, Vans) so it's largely free of annoying advertising. Did I mention the beautiful photography?
  • Outside

    • writing, thinking, and stories about living an active lifestyle in the outdoors
  • Field & Stream

    • outdoor living with a focus on hunting, fishing, camping and such
  • Fly Fisherman

    • all about fly fishing: stories, gear, etc.
  • Sail

    • largely a vehicle for advertising and selling expensive sailboat gear, but with some cool articles on sailboat crusing adventures and articles on boat repair
  • Juxtapoz

    • wacky, well-made magazine about contemporary art and artists. Primarily seems to focus on street art, as opposed to the gallery world. Nice thick pages. 
  • Wired

    • a focus on the implications (philosophical, practical, political) of the internet, technology, AI, that sort of stuff. Wired used to be a lot better—it's much shorter now, physically smaller, and full of ads, but it's still fairly good. The internet has really hurt most print magazines. Yes, pretty ironic considering it's Wired, but hey...
  • Popular Science

    • always a cool look at cutting edge science, specifically its practical applications. They like to consider both near- and far-future tech, and also to look back at what we used to think would be the tech of the future.
  • Smithsonian

    • this is a cool and well-made magazine. Kind of like National Geographic, but more American in focus.
  • Poetry

    • obviously new poems are featured here, but perhaps the most valuable feature is the interviews with poets about writing
  • VQR (Virginia Quarterly Review)

    • “a national journal of literature and discussion” is how this literary journal from the University of Virginia subtitles itself. Beautifully designed, glossy paper, interesting and kind-of-smart stories you wouldn’t have thought about but find yourself drawn into. 
  • National Geographic

    • it has a yellow border on the cover and is concerned, it seems, with anything related to life on planet Earth. They’ve always been famous for their photos (well, since photography started being a thing), but the writing in their articles seems to have gotten stronger lately. There’s always at least one article that’s really interesting each month. Reading it will make you smarter.
  • The Atlantic

    • topical stories and articles that take in-depth look at the stuff going on these days (politics, science, world affairs, business, education, and the arts). “Smart thinking about tough issues for 155 years” is what they say. Somewhat on the left side of the political spectrum in their concerns.
  • Harper’s

    • another mainstay of American journalism, Harper’s, “the oldest general interest monthly in America,” is kind of similar to the Atlantic but a bit more focused on political issues. Well-written, deeply researched, helps you think about today’s issues in perspective and depth. Definitely coming from the left side, politically.
  • The Economist

    • A weekly magazine with an international focus on world affairs and politics, chiefly (but not solely) as they relate to business and world commerce. Economically its viewpoint would be considered classically conservative, but that doesn't always equate to political conservatism these days. Reading this will make you really smart, and definitely provides a non-American take on current global issues.
  • National Review

    • Founded by William F. Buckley in 1955, this magazine provides a mainstay conservative take on political, social, and cultural affairs. Well-reasoned and thoughtful.
  • Weekly Standard

    • Another magazine focused on politics and social issues from a conservative viewpoint, this one is a bit more opinion and editorial based.
  • Essence

    • Fashion, beauty, and lifestyle magazine for African-American women.
  • Progressive Farmer

    • Country life, agriculture, and farming-focused magazine, since 1886. (Little known fact: Southern Living, that magazine your mom/grandmother always gets, was a spin off from Progressive Farmer when they found themselves getting really popular among southern housewives.)
  • Mother Earth News

    • Practical ideas and advice on topics like renewable energy at home, organic gardening, and, in general, living the self-sufficient lifestyle.
  • Mindful

    • Magazine dedicated to “helping you live mindfully,” be the best person you can, and live in the moment.
  • Yoga Journal

    • Offers all practitioners—from beginners to masters—expert information on how to live a healthier, happier, and more fulfilling life both on and off the mat.
  • Spirituality and Health

    • Mindfulness, fitness, exercise, diet, body shape, etc.: inspiration for conscious living and healthy lifestyle, social action, and spiritual wisdom. Body and mind.
  • ADDitude

    • The “happy, healthy lifestyle magazine for people with ADD/ADHD” with articles on diagnosis, treatment, therapies, and learning and school challenges and opportunities.